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  • Locations: Perth, Australia
  • Program Terms: Summer
  • Partner Institution/Organization Homepage: Click to visit
  • Restrictions: Princeton applicants only
  • This program is currently not accepting applications.
Fact Sheet:
Fact Sheet:
Dept Offering Program: Global Health Program Type of Program: Internship
Language of Instruction: English Language Prerequisite: No
Program Features: Field Work, Research Degree Level: 1st year u/g students, 2nd year u/g students, 3rd year u/g students
Time Away: Summer Housing options: Apartment (alone), Apartment (Shared), Guesthouse, Student responsibility
Duration of Program: More than 4 weeks
Program Description:

TKI Logo
Telethon Kids Institute
Various Research Internships

 
Location: Perth, Australia
Duration: 8-12 weeks
Number of Positions: 5
 
About: The Telethon Kids Institute (TKI) is a research organization that brings together communities, researchers, practitioners, policy makers and funders, who share a vision to improve the health and wellbeing of children through excellence in research.  TKI’s research focus areas include aboriginal health; brain and behavior; chronic and severe diseases; and early environment.
 
Intern Responsibilities: There are five potential focus areas for a student intern.
 
The Early Neurodevelopment and Mental Health team focuses on addressing developmental risk and promoting resilience to developmental vulnerability and mental health problems from conception through to five years. This project aims to develop and trial “STEPs,” a novel, strengths-based online parenting program to improve self-regulation in toddlers (18-36 months) and promote parent/caregiver self-efficacy, mental health, and parenting skills. The project will address an important gap highlighted by our community partners: the need for a scalable, evidence-informed, toddler self-regulation program that is designed with and for West Australian families. In addition to promoting better health, development, and educational outcomes for children, this project will provide important insights into family engagement in parenting programs, strategies for successful co-design with families and services, and barriers and facilitators to implementing scalable programs. This project will also provide insight into Aboriginal families’ program preferences and how these align with their caregiving practices.
 
FOCUS AREA 1: Promoting self-regulation among infants and young children: What works for whom, under which circumstances, and how?
An opportunity exists for an intern to be involved in several aspects of the project, including literature review, stakeholder consultation, and intervention development. Day to day tasks will include: familiarisation with project (including literature and data); data extraction; stakeholder meetings; project team meetings; administrative tasks; intervention design; and qualitative interviews.
 
Qualifications: An intern should have a background in psychology or related discipline. Previous experience in qualitative and quantitative data analysis, excellent critical thinking and problem-solving skills, as well as an interest in early childhood development is preferred.

The Child Health, Development and Education team (inclusive of the Fraser Mustard Centre) takes a population health approach and focuses on a broad range of factors that impact on children’s health, development, education and wellbeing across the ecological spectrum (i.e. from individual characteristics, family and home environment, community, service provision and policy impact). Unique to this team is the innovative Fraser Mustard Centre, a collaboration between Telethon Kids Institute and the South Australian Department for Education which brings together leading Australian child development researchers and government policy makers and planners. This collaboration aims to drive high quality, policy relevant research to improve the lives of children and insure the research is quickly and effectively translated into policy decisions.
 
FOCUS AREA 2: The relationship between birth order and children’s health and development in Lao PDR
This project will utilise data collected as part of a randomised control trial financed by the World Bank in Lao People’s Democratic Republic in Southeast Asia, the Early Childhood Education Project. It will seek to investigate the interplay between birth order, household socioeconomic status, and children’s early health and developmental outcomes. An opportunity exists for an intern to be involved in multiple components of this project, including literature reviewing and synthesis, data cleaning, analysis, interpretation and write up. Overall, this internship will support the development of an academic manuscript for publication. It presents an excellent opportunity to collaborate with a highly motivated team of researchers and make a meaningful contribution to the evidence on supporting children to achieve their potential.
 
FOCUS AREA 3: Early childhood education dose and children’s development in low and middle income countries
This project will use data from two World Bank financed projects, one in Lao People’s Democratic Republic in Southeast Asia and another in Tonga in Oceania. It will aim to investigate the relationship between early childhood education dose, including community playgroup and preschool, and children’s early developmental outcomes. An opportunity exists for an intern to be involved in multiple components of this project, including literature reviewing and synthesis, data cleaning, analysis, interpretation and write up. Overall, this internship will support the development of an academic manuscript for publication. It presents an excellent opportunity to collaborate with a highly motivated team of researchers and make a meaningful contribution to the evidence on supporting children to achieve their potential.
 
FOCUS AREA 4: Early childhood education quality and children’s development in Lao PDR
The Sustainable Development Agenda has encouraged a shift in focus beyond provision of early childhood education, to aspects of the quality of early learning environments. This project will utilise data collected as part of a randomised control trial financed by the World Bank in Lao People’s Democratic Republic in Southeast Asia, the Early Childhood Education Project. It will explore the quality of different forms of early childhood education as measured by the Measuring Early Learning Environments (MELE) instrument – a UNESCO, World Bank, Brookings Institution and UNICEF initiative, and how this is related to children’s early development. An opportunity exists for an intern to be involved in multiple components of this project, including literature reviewing and synthesis, data cleaning, analysis, interpretation and write up. Overall, this internship will support the development of an academic manuscript for publication. It presents an excellent opportunity to collaborate with a highly motivated team of researchers and make a meaningful contribution to the evidence on supporting children to achieve their potential.
 
FOCUS AREA 5: Influence of school suspensions on child and adolescent wellbeing.
South Australia is the only jurisdiction globally that conducts an annual state-wide census of student wellbeing; the Wellbeing and Engagement Collection (WEC). As a component of the WEC, young people, from grades 4 through to 12, provide information on their social and emotional wellbeing. Through data linkage of the South Australian Department for Education administrative behavioural data and the WEC, this project will investigate the influence of school suspensions, expulsions and exclusions on child and adolescent self-reported social and emotional wellbeing. An opportunity exists for an intern to be involved in multiple components of this project. From literature reviewing, data cleaning and data analysis. This will support the development of an academic manuscript for publication and research snapshots for relevant policy makers. This is an excellent opportunity to work with a highly motivated team of researchers and collaborate with government policy makers.
 
Qualifications: An intern should have a background in public health, psychology, education or a related discipline. Previous experience in quantitative data analysis and undertaking literature reviews is desired. Excellent critical thinking and problem-solving skills and excellent attention to detail and record-keeping ability is a plus.

Travel Notice: It is not yet certain whether summer 2021 internships will be on-site or virtual.  If health and safety conditions improve, it is possible that some internships may be on-site. CHW will make final determinations on the travel status of each internship in consultation with Princeton University officials, host organizations, and selected interns by spring 2021.
 
Funding: If travel to the internship site is permitted, CHW will cover all expenses for airfare, housing, food, local transportation, and incidentals.  If an intern chooses to stay home, or if travel is not permitted, CHW will provide a $1,500 stipend to remote interns.

Website: www.telethonkids.org.au
 
View Internship Summary Posters from Past Telethon Kids Institute Princeton Student Interns:
 
Summer 2019
Coco Chou '20 - Missing Piece Surveillance Study
David Cordoba '20 - Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes in Western Australia
Jocelyn Galindo '21 - The Measurement of Adequate Housing Conditions in Aboriginal Households Living in Urban Settings
Rachel Kim '20 - Quality of Life and Child Intellectual Disability
Lucy Wang '21 - SToP Trial: Assessing Impetigo and Scabies in Remote Aboriginal Communities

Summer 2018
Ellen Anshelevich '19 - Developing an Effective Community Care Program For Skin Infections in Aboriginal Communities
Andy Zheng '20 - Evaluating and Supporting Suicide Prevention: Addressing Social and Emotional Wellbeing

Summer 2017
Patrick Dinh '18 - Racism & Skin Disease in Aboriginal Communities in the Western Desert
Aaron Gurayah '18 - Beat CF: Overview of an Adaptive Clinical Trial in Respitory Medicine
Danielle Victoriano '19 - AusVaxSafety: Descriptive Analysis for Zostava

Dates / Deadlines:

This program is not currently accepting applications. Please consult the sponsoring department's website for application open dates.

This program is currently not accepting applications.